OrCam Visual Aid

June 7, 2017

The OrCam MyEye is a portable, artificial vision device that allows the visually impaired to understand text and identify objects. The device was developed by Israeli-based company OrCam Technologies Limited, and was released as a prototype in September 2013.

The OrCam MyEye consists of two main components: the head unit and the base unit. The head unit consists of a camera and a microphone, and is mounted on the frames of a pair of eyeglasses. The box-like base unit contains the algorithms and processing components that give the device its functionality, and can be clipped to a belt or left to rest in a pocket. The head unit and base unit are adjoined by a connecting cable.

The OrCam MyEye recognizes text and products, and speaks to the person wearing the device via a bone-conduction earpiece.[5] With the point of the person’s finger, the device instantly responds and will infer whether it needs to read, find an item, or recognize a product depending on the environment. It may do so without searching for audio books, learning new software, or using other tools.

Applications:

Reading text, menus, street signs

Facial Recognition

Product Searches in supermarkets for over  100 products

Identifies currency value

For more info, including cost & videos:

http://www.orcam.com/


Small Text Scanner for AT

March 26, 2017

from FeedBlitz

The C-Pen Reader Packs A Lot of Features in a Small Package

When I came across the C-Pen Reader at the FETC conference this past year, I knew that I had to request a review unit to test it out. After contacting the company, they approved my request and

C-Pen Reader

provided me a C-Pen Reader for the review. The opinions reflected in this blog are my own. I have been in the field of assistive technology for over 25 years and over these years have looked at a number of portable hand held reading solutions that promised to make the reading process easy and quick from scanning to reading text.

for more info:

Orange County NC Library News

February 22, 2017

The following is by Jason Richmond, Librarian

Subject: Accessability Grant

As we head towards a New Year, I wanted to share with all of you the progress that has been made with the Accessible Library Project. The State Library awarded us funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to make our services and collections more accessible and to hold programming raising disability awareness. Many of the big, visible parts of the plan haven’t been implemented yet but the foundations have been laid for an exciting start to 2017.

In October, the Triangle Disability Awareness Council led a great training on awareness and customer service for all library staff. Our librarians valued the chance to ask questions and learn about more ways they can assist all those who may come through our doors. Thank you again to all the trainers that made the trek up to Hillsborough!

November brought a makerspace to the library that showcased ways tinkering and technology can be leveraged to help others in our community. Participants in our workshops adapted toys by adding accessible switches and learned about creating prosthetic hands using 3D printers.

Assistive technology hardware has arrived at the library and will become available to the public by February. Library staff will be training on our new video magnifiers and assistive listening kits over the next couple weeks. For Disability Awareness Month in March the library will be working with the Triangle Disability Awareness Council again to hold educational and engaging programs.

A big thank you to each and every one of you! All of your support in time, encouragement and expertise has made this possible. Thank you to all the library staff who are making disability services part of their daily commitment to our community. And thank you to the library’s leaders, Lucinda and Andrea, who have made disability services a priority of the library and supported this initiative from the start.

The library will be sharing more information about our activities throughout the coming months as more services become available. If you have any questions please reach me at my contact information below.

Regards,

JASON RICHMOND | TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT AND INSTRUCTION LIBRARIAN

Description: Description: Description: OCPL-RGB-72dpi-tiny

137 W. MARGARET LANE

HILLSBOROUGH, NC 27278

jrichmond@orangecountync.gov

919.245.2533


More Info on the Book Eye 4

November 17, 2016
Here are a few more notes on the Book Eye 4 as a resource for low-vision/blind users.  Johnathon Kirk of UNC has sent us a brief description of his experience with the Book eye.
He highly recommends it as a free book scanner and reader.  see below
Lauren Tappan
bookeye-4

More Info on the Book Eye4 Scanner

November 8, 2016

The following is from Lauren Tappan.

Many University libraries’ now have the Book Eye 4.  Jack Mitchell from Indigo Logics,
Johnathon Kirk from the Duke Eye Center, my husband and I met at the Duke Library with
the goal of using the Book Eye 4, my I-Pad and the KNFB Reader to have scanned files
read to me.
The Book Eye 4 is a great document scanner that will allow you to send scanned documents to a thumb drive or PDF file.  It has large print on the navigational desk top so it would be easy for a low-vision user.
   My goal was to scan a document on the Book Eye 4 and send this
scanned document to my I-Pad e-mail program.
   Unfortunately, my I-Pad Voice Over does not read PDF files so we were trying to
figure out a way to have these scanned documents read.
  Jack Mitchell showed us how we can send the PDF file to my KNFB Reader ap
where the document can be saved and read to me in a timely fashion.
   As a low-vision user of these devices, I was looking for a quick and easy
scanning system that would allow me to scan at least 20 pages at a time.
When I have tried to use the KNFB Reader to scan material sometimes
my hands are not steady enough and I don’t get a clear copy of the page.
  Jack Mitchell showed us a way to arrange the I-Pad on a flat surface,
exposing the camera and then being able to use the I_pad and KNFB
Reader like the Book Eye 4 scanner.
  It sounds complicated but once you know the system things go quickly.
Lauren

Google developing Macular Degeneration Diagnosis Program

September 19, 2016

In 1996, IBM’s Deep Blue program beat Garry Kasparov at chess. In 2016, Google’s Deep Mind beat the world champion Go player.

Google plans to use more than one million anonymized eye scans to teach computers how to diagnose ocular disease.

The Menlo Park, Calif.-based company has signed a deal with a British eye hospital to use artificial intelligence to learn from the medical records of 1.6 million patients in London hospitals.

The goal is to teach a computer program to recognize the signs of two common types of eye disease, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration.

That’s something humans are surprisingly imperfect at. Physicians diagnose these ailments by analyzing medical charts and interviewing patients, yet still get it wrong 10 to 20% of the time.

Artificial intelligence could enable a machine to scan millions of records and documents, learn from them and then make more accurate diagnoses and save time while doing so.

The partnership, announced Monday, is between DeepMind, an artificial intelligence company owned by Google, and Moorfields Eye Hospital in London.

For more info:

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2016/07/05/google-deepmind-artificial-intelligence-ai-eye-disease-london-go-diabetes/86722906/

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-36713308

 


Occupational Therapists Provide Help with Assistive Technology

July 20, 2016

This article is by Lauren Tappan.

Here are another few suggestions for low vision users of Assistive Technology. I recently was able to work with an OT from Therapeutic Solutions. Therapeutic Solutions is located in the Raleigh-Durham area. These OT visits were paid for by Medicare. I found the low vision OT very helpful and supportive. She was able to work with me on updating my IPad to make it visually, user friendly. I had many questions about the KNFB Reader. Because of her help, I am able to use a KNFB Reader to download books.
I now use my Google app to verbally dictate web searches. I am able to use the zoom feature on the IPad, which allows me to read and hear information in my email program. I was able to find short cuts for deleting emails in my email program and I am able to dictate responses to my emails.
I have also been able to download the BARD app. BARD is a free app service with the North Carolina Library for the Blind, which allows me to download books from their library. Because of her help, I was able to find an app that gives me updated flight information when I’m travelling.
She also encouraged me to buy a new pair of light sensitive glasses, which also screen Blue Light. These glasses have been very helpful for me in navigating on new side walks and streets, etc. You can find these glasses from Maxiaids. She was also able to help me with special techniques for the use of various equipment’s in our kitchen and laundry room, which has made use of these appliances easier for me.
For all of these reasons, I highly recommend low vision users of Assistive Technology equipment to investigate if there are low vision OT’s (Occupational Therapists) in your area. If you contact Therapeutic Solutions in the Raleigh-Durham area, they might be able to locate other OT’s in an area near you.
Lauren