Occupational Therapists Provide Help with Assistive Technology

July 20, 2016

This article is by Lauren Tappan.

Here are another few suggestions for low vision users of Assistive Technology. I recently was able to work with an OT from Therapeutic Solutions. Therapeutic Solutions is located in the Raleigh-Durham area. These OT visits were paid for by Medicare. I found the low vision OT very helpful and supportive. She was able to work with me on updating my IPad to make it visually, user friendly. I had many questions about the KNFB Reader. Because of her help, I am able to use a KNFB Reader to download books.
I now use my Google app to verbally dictate web searches. I am able to use the zoom feature on the IPad, which allows me to read and hear information in my email program. I was able to find short cuts for deleting emails in my email program and I am able to dictate responses to my emails.
I have also been able to download the BARD app. BARD is a free app service with the North Carolina Library for the Blind, which allows me to download books from their library. Because of her help, I was able to find an app that gives me updated flight information when I’m travelling.
She also encouraged me to buy a new pair of light sensitive glasses, which also screen Blue Light. These glasses have been very helpful for me in navigating on new side walks and streets, etc. You can find these glasses from Maxiaids. She was also able to help me with special techniques for the use of various equipment’s in our kitchen and laundry room, which has made use of these appliances easier for me.
For all of these reasons, I highly recommend low vision users of Assistive Technology equipment to investigate if there are low vision OT’s (Occupational Therapists) in your area. If you contact Therapeutic Solutions in the Raleigh-Durham area, they might be able to locate other OT’s in an area near you.
Lauren

Bisphosphonate side effect: AMD

July 16, 2016

Bisphosphonates, which are typically used to prevent osteoporosis, are some of the most prescribed drugs. They are known to increase the risk of inflammatory eye diseases such as scleritis, uveitis, and optic neuritis, and their pro-inflammatory properties may account for this increased risk as well as the flu-like symptoms that have been reported as adverse effects of their use.

The appearance of flu-like symptoms after use of the injected bisphosphonate zolendronic acid (Reclast/Novartis) has been attributed to the release of inflammatory mediators such as C-reactive protein. This common marker of systemic inflammation has been associated with coronary artery disease and implicated in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), including its neovascular (wet) form.   –

See more at: http://www.hcplive.com/medical-news/oral-bisphosphonate-use-poses-risk-of-wet-age-related-macular-degeneration#sthash.7J2ZfBgI.dpuf


Bionic eye restores man’s vision

July 3, 2016

This article is from http://www.wkyc.com/

Steve McMillin learned at age 32 he had Retinitis Pigmentosa, a genetic disease that would stop his retinas from functioning. By 49, he was completely blind.

He kept up to date on new research emerging and heard about the bionic retina, a retinal prosthesis device that sends electrical impulses to the remaining retinal cells and restores limited vision patterns.

“They take the lens off the top of your eye, remove the vitrious fluid and install a six-by-ten grid of electrodes in your eye,” said McMillin.

Last June, Steve became the twentieth patient in the US to receive the device when he had his surgery at Cleveland Clinic’s Cole Eye Institute

He can see vague, black and white images.

“So you can tell, well, there’s the road, there’s a driveway, there’s a mailbox, there’s a shrub. Am I veering off track? It’s another tool in the toolbox and, boy, it’s a big tool,” McMillin says.

When asked what the most important thing he saw after ten years of blindness was, he replied, “To go out in the moonlight and see your wife’s face.”

Read more at on.wkyc.com/29e6JTB.