Limit Ranibizumab Injections in Macular Degeneration

September 20, 2014

The lucky number is 7 — or 7.1 to be exact — the mean optimum number of injections of intravitreal ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech) that should be given during the first year of treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration, according to a new meta-analysis.

The results suggest that beyond 7 injections, there is little likelihood of additional gains in visual acuity, said Heinrich Gerding, MD, an ophthalmologist in the Department of Retinology at Pallas Clinic Olten in Switzerland.

for more info: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/832020?src=rss


Radiotherapy for Wet AMD

September 28, 2013

A study in Hamburg, Germany shows that radiation therapy, in conjunction with injections of Lucentis, reduces the frequncy required of the Lucentis injections.

For more info:  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/811801

 


FDA Approves First Drug for Diabetic Eye Disease

August 13, 2012

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday gave its approval to the drug Lucentis as a treatment for diabetic macular edema (DME), making it the first medicine approved for the ailment.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, DME occurs when fluid enters the macula, the central part of the eye’s retina. This causes the macula to expand, blurring vision. Because up to 26 million Americans have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, this eye condition is a major source of new-onset vision loss, the FDA said. In 2010, 3.9 million diabetic adults had trouble with their vision.

Diabetes is a major public health issue in our country, and all patients with diabetes are at risk of developing diabetic macular edema. Laser surgery has been the only approved treatment until now for DME.

For more info: http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2012/08/10/fda-gives-nod-to-first-drug-for-diabetic-eye-disease


Possible Side Effect of Lucentis

October 31, 2011
Mayo Clinic Detective Work Shows Possible Side Effect in Macular Degeneration Drug
 Two major drug trials conclude there was little risk from a drug aimed at age-related macular degeneration. Yet a Mayo Clinic ophthalmologist began to note something concerning in some of her patients: an increase in pressure inside the eye. It led to a retrospective study and findings that will be presented at the American Academy of Ophthalmology in Orlando.

Sophie Bakri, M.D., had been treating patients in her clinic with Food and Drug Administration-approved ranibizumab (Lucentis), when she began noticing a change in some patients.

“I was treating patients and measuring pressures, and I was surprised to see that in some of these people, their intraocular pressure was higher, and they didn’t have a diagnosis of glaucoma,” Dr. Bakri says. “So, why did the pressure go up? Was it from the drug itself, or the actual injection? Is this real? You don’t know if it’s a fluke unless you go back and look at the clinical trials. I took a closer look at the pooled data.”

Intraocular pressure (IOP) is a measure of fluid pressure inside the eye. Measured in millimeters of mercury (mm/Hg), IOP that is higher than normal or above baseline (higher than 21 mm/Hg) can indicate glaucoma.

Data from the two clinical trials in many ways held the answers to Dr. Bakri’s questions, but she found that knowing what to look for helps.

Dr. Bakri found what she suspected: a subset of patients had increased IOP.

“We still don’t know if it goes up because of the drug or the pressure of the repeated monthly injections, or both,” she says. The take-home finding: intraocular pressure should be monitored in eyes receiving ranibizumab.

“A greater proportion of eyes in the ranibizumab groups had IOP increases regardless of the presence or absence of pre-existing risk factors, such as history of glaucoma, suspicion of glaucoma, ocular hypertension or use of a glaucoma medication,” Dr. Bakri says.

About Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education for people from all walks of life. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about and http://www.mayoclinic.org/news .

SOURCE: Mayo Clinic

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/mayo-clinic-detective-work-shows-possible-side-effect-in-macular-degeneration-drug-2011-10-24