Adverse Stem Cell Effect

January 22, 2018

A patient taking part in a clinical trial of an induced pluripotent stem cell treatment for age-related macular degeneration has experienced an adverse effect, the Japan Times reports.

The patient, who is in his 70s, received a transplant of retinal cells derived from donor iPS cells to treat his age-related macular degeneration, the paper adds. The Japan News notes that the clinical trial, consisting of five patients, began in March.

After treatment, the patient’s retina became swollen, leading him to have surgery earlier this week in the hopes of relieving the swelling, as steroids and anti-vascular endothelial growth factors didn’t diminish his symptoms, the Japan Times says. The team removed his pre-retinal membrane and his symptoms improved, it adds

Masayo Takahashi, the Riken researcher who heads the team conducting the trial, said at a news conference earlier this week that “[w]e cannot deny the causal correlation with iPS cells.”

Takahashi first tested this technique in 2014 when an 80-year-old Japanese woman received retinal pigment epithelium cells that were developed from reprogrammed skin cells. The Japan Times says the new patient is the first to experience an adverse reaction to the treatment.

But University College London’s Mike Cheetham tells New Scientist that the swelling was probably due to the original surgery, not the iPS cells.

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Diet Changes to Avoid Macular Degeneration

January 22, 2018

Certain diets in large population studies may have some effect in slowing the progression of age-related macular degeneration. Some studies suggest that eating green, leafy vegetables and other vegetables may slow the progression of AMD, while people who do not typically eat any such vegetables may experience faster progression of AMD. Some potentially beneficial vegetables include kale, spinach, turnips, collard greens and romaine lettuce. Other vegetables that may slow the progression of AMD include broccoli, spinach and Brussels sprouts.

— Dr. Francis DeCroos, Southeastern Retina Associates; member, Chattanooga-Hamilton County Medical Society


Avoiding Macular Degeneration

January 21, 2018

Macular degeneration is a common eye condition that typically manifests in people over age 50. It damages the macula of the eye, which is located near the center of the retina, and can lead to vision loss. The macula is the part of the eye that helps you see objects that are right in front of you. When this area is damaged, you may see spots or your vision may get blurry or dark. These changes might make it more difficult for you to drive or perform other everyday activities.

Macular degeneration can run in families, so if you have relatives with the condition, you may be at higher risk of developing it yourself. However, the good news is that modifiable risk factors also play an important role when it comes to developing macular degeneration. According to the National Eye Institute, you can reduce your risk by quitting smoking. Smoking cigarettes can double your risk of the condition. Also, try to maintain a healthy blood pressure, act to lower high cholesterol, and eat a healthy diet, one high in nutrients from green leafy vegetables and fish.

Not only are these recommendations beneficial when it comes to preventing macular degeneration, they are good, healthy practices for any individual. There is also evidence that certain nutritional supplements may slow the progression of macular degeneration in some instances. Discuss preventive strategies and early detection with your doctor if macular degeneration runs in your family. And getting a regular eye exam is a good idea, even for people without a family history of the condition.

For more info:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/can-i-avoid-macular-degeneration


Vigorous Exercise Tied to Macular Degeneration in Men

December 17, 2017

A new study suggests that vigorous physical activity may increase the risk for vision loss, a finding that has surprised and puzzled researchers.

Using questionnaires, Korean researchers evaluated physical activity among 211,960 men and women ages 45 to 79 in 2002 and 2003. Then they tracked diagnoses of age-related macular degeneration, from 2009 to 2013. Macular degeneration, the progressive deterioration of the central area of the retina, is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly.

They found that exercising vigorously five or more days a week was associated with a 54 percent increased risk of macular degeneration in men. They did not find the association in women.

for more info:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/14/well/move/vigorous-exercise-tied-to-macular-degeneration-in-men.html

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/article-abstract/2665836


IrisVision

December 17, 2017

IrisVision – Multipurpose Headworn System for Near and Distance Vision

Hand held magnifiers, electronic readers, magnifying desk lamps and telescopic glasses are just a few of the low vision aids that help those with macular degeneration see and read better. You perhaps have often heard this statement, “different magnifiers for different tasks.”

Near and Distance Vision Magnification

What if you could minimize the number of magnifiers and aids you use and instead wear a headworn device that could help you read your newspaper AND enjoy your favorite TV show, all with better clarity? This low vision technology does just that.

“IrisVision harnesses groundbreaking technology into a single, hands-free device to help with many common functional tasks needed by those who live with a vision impairment. It boasts an extra large LED screen and expansive field of view, and a powerful camera with auto-focus capabilities. Best of all? You only need one!” IrisVision

Find out more about how this low vision technology works and if it could be of benefit to you:

IrisVision – A New Type of Low Vision Technology 

Leslie Degner, RN, BSN

Better Health for Better Vision

www.WebRN-MacularDegeneration.com 


Stem cells used to fight Macular Degeneration

November 7, 2017

The following is from Lauren Tappan:

UCSB scientists near cure for blinding eye disease.
Once thought impossible, a cure for a blinding eye disease is in the works at UC Santa Barbara.

Researchers are in a phase one clinical trial with a procedure that would improve or cure the vision for those suffering from Macular Degeneration. The blinding eye disease is the leading cause of blindness in older Americans and impacts the sight of 20 million people worldwide.

It’s a sophisticated procedure that places stem cells in the back of the eye to repair damaged areas.

Those cells would last for the patients lifetime and would be implanted in a one-time procedure.

Getting this treatment to the most people could still be years away but the work being done at UCSB is groundbreaking in the world of vision restoration.

“In five years my hope is that we’ll be ready to get this approved and out to patients to help people who currently don’t have a therapy to use,” Professor Clegg of UC Santa Barbara said.

For more info:

http://www.keyt.com/news/ucsb-scientists-near-cure-for-blinding-eye-disease/649063682


SuperVision + magnifier App

November 3, 2017

SuperVision+ is the only magnifier (magnifying glass) app on the market that offers a supreme live image stabilization capability. Highly magnified images are usually shaking. It is a problem especially for old people. No more image shaking with SuperVision+ magnifier (magnifying glass).

Highlighted in Technology News for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired published by the American Foundation for the Blind.

From reading small print at near distance to seeing signs at far distance, SuperVision+ magnifier (magnifying glass) is your go-to app for seeing better and clearer.

Place your phone camera close to small objects, the app can also be used as a microscope. You can see something small that even normally sighted people can’t see.

Features:
– Easy to activate stabilization. Just press the screen and hold.
– Option to only stabilize vertically, allowing horizontal reading movement.
– Large and highly visible buttons.
– Freeze images at high resolution for seeing details.
– Easy to use either with one hand or two hands.
– Landscape mode
– Flash light support.
– Save images to gallery.
– Share images to social network.
– No advertisement.

for more info:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=edu.harvard.schepens.supervisionv7&hl=en